GOT GREEN?:
A SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF GREEN SPACE AND LAND USE TO NEIGHBORHOOD CHANGE IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, 1970-2000

 
Michaud, M.
 
Maryland has become well-known for its progressive efforts to implement Smart Growth policies, from programs that protect large tracts of agricultural rural land to those that acquire and rehabilitate urban parks. Critics of sprawl and proponents of livable cities have sought to promote, among other things, a mixture of land use that includes more green spaces in the form of trees, parks, and open space. However, there is insufficient understanding of the long-term dynamics between these land uses and adjacent neighborhoods. This research seeks to understand the relationship between open space and neighborhood stability, defined here as long-term sustainability or resilience to change. In particular, we ask if there is a correlation between green spaces and neighborhood stability and whether or not protected lands have the same neighborhood effect as unprotected lands. Using Baltimore and the Gwynns Falls watershed as study sites we can perform a longitudinal examination of neighborhoods and the impacts of green space. This research will help government agencies and other organizations target specific interventions, such as open space acquisition and tree plantings, by understanding the dynamic interactions between socioeconomic processes and green space.
 
Keywords: socioeconomic processes, tree plantings, smart growth policies
 

[ Back ]