BALTIMORE METROPOLITAN WATER RESOURCE GWYNNS FALLS FEASIBILITY STUDY: STATUS REPORT 2
 
Christopher Spaur
 
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District, and City of Baltimore are proposing to implement a number of aquatic ecosystem restoration projects in the Dead Run and Maidens Choice Run subwatersheds of the Gwynns Falls in Baltimore City. By subwatershed these projects are:
 
Dead Run
Rehabilitation of 4 miles of sewer pipe along the stream channel
Stabilization of 130 feet of stream bank to protect a sewer line
 
Maidens Choice Run
Rehabilitation of 3 miles of sewer pipe, primarily aligned along the stream channel
Restoration of 3.3 acres of wetland at 3 sites
Construction of a stormwater management feature
Daylighting 600 feet of underground stormwater pipe
Stabilization of 1,700 ft of stream bank and channel (includes 1,475 ft of stream restoration and 225 ft of sewer line protection)
 
Collectively, these projects should increase flows in Dead Run and Maidens Choice Run, reduce the contribution of pollutants that originate from the sewer system, improve the quality of stormwater runoff, stabilize eroding channel banks and bottoms, and restore a natural channel through daylighting of a section of piped stream. Improved water quality conditions will also produce reduced threats to human health posed by stream waters, improved aesthetics and reduced sewage odors, and an overall improvement in the quality of life for area residents. Several of the projects will provide educational opportunity benefits for schools that are nearby or adjacent to the streams. The total project cost is estimated at $14,659,000. The project will be implemented as part of the Corps Civil Works Program. A Draft Feasibility Report and Integrated Environmental Assessment providing information on the proposed projects is expected to be released for public and agency review pending approval by CorpsíŽ higher authorities in Washington, D.C. and N.Y. City.
 
Keywords: Restoration, aquatic ecosystem, sewer system rehabilitation, stormwater management, wetlands, stream habitat
 

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