.|  Baltimore Ecosystem Study

 
2013 Artist-In-Residence Patterson Clark
 

For the past 10 years, Patterson Clark's artwork has been dedicated to developing a complete sustainable system for creating art utilizing non-native plants he harvests from the environment in which he works. This project, which he calls "Alienweeds," began from his desire to restore a measure of balance between the native and non-native plants growing nearby his home in Whitehaven Park in Washington, D.C.
 
Clark uses aspects of these plants to create papers, inks, brushes, pens, printing blocks, and cordage, finally resulting in playful prints which document the amount of labor and materials used in his meticulous processes. Clark is also a visual journalist: in 2009 he created the column "Urban Jungle" for the Washington Post. Each week, Clark highlights a particular aspect of the urban ecosystem in text and illustrations, incorporating the research of scientists he interviews and cites.
 
The selection committee suggested that by spending time with BES scientists as an Artist-in-Residence, Clark would be a potential conduit for wider exposure of BES research, and in addition, his involvement in BES would stimulate the social and natural scientists, and the educators in the project to explore new avenues and stimuli of creativity.
 
His work, featured in national media outlets, can be explored and sampled online here: http://alienweeds.com/
 


 
Index1308a (on left) & Index1308c (on right) Pigments made from Hedera hibernica, Rosa multiflora, Celastrus orbiculatus, Mahonia bealei, Lonicera maackii and weed soot on paper from Broussonetia papyrifera; printed from Morus alba and Acer platanus wood blocks. Each @ 11" x 11", 2013
 

 

 

 


 
http://alienweeds.com/BESSlider.html
 
http://alienweeds.com/BESHover.html
 

During his residency with BES, Clark created online maps that can be added to and edited by BES scientists with relative ease.
 
http://alienweeds.com/BESSlider.html
 
http://alienweeds.com/BESHover.html

 
Funding for this work has been generously provided by a grant from the National Science Foundation to the BES LTER, and with funds from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.